Brexit and the politics of irrationality

A few miles from where I am sitting, something altogether disturbing is about to happen.  There appears to be every sign that, in the South Wales valleys, thousands of people in one of the most deprived areas of the UK – one whose Less Developed Region status under EU rules means that it is a […]

Don’t mention the war: Greens, Iraq and Godwin’s law

Earlier this year, Brighton and Hove City Council passed a motion of no confidence in its Green administration.  The debate was a curious affair, illustrating much about Brighton and Hove politics; in particular the way in which, nominally about the record of the administration, it turned into a series of personal attacks on Labour’s leader […]

Fringe parties and the dangerous allure of apolitical politics

Imagine a political party. Its public face is a single, easily identifiable figure who receives considerable media exposure and is regarded as having a genius for self-promotion, while somehow avoiding the scrutiny that more mainstream politicians face.  Despite the fact that our public face is a seasoned and accomplished professional politician, the party seeks to […]

UKIP, neoliberalism and the revolt of the moderately entitled

Much cyber-ink has been spilled following last week’s strong UKIP showing in the English County Council elections – it might seem superfluous to add to it.  I think the strength of UKIP’s “surge” is overrated – these were partial elections in which the major centres of population did not vote (along with Scotland and most […]

Why culture wars are breaking out in the Tory party

It’s been an interesting couple of days in the evolution of the Tory party.  Ahead of tomorrow’s House of Commons vote on equal marriage a group of Conservative party constituency chairmen hands in a petition at No 10 urging Cmaeron to delay the vote; while the Mail on Sunday carries an interview with Chris Grayling – […]